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Succulent Dry Propagation

(a beginner's first try)

June 19, 2018

 

My local garden center was having a 50% off sale so I decided to take advantage. My original thought was to buy succulents, flowers, and other plants to study and then recreate in sugar - a process I started not too long ago with flowers and bouquets from my local grocery store. This meant taking apart these 'specimens' for studies, which also meant discarding them after completing the studies. 

I still plan on studying my purchases, only in such a way as to not destroy them, which will mean taking detailed measurements and images, a large part of my current realistic sugar flower and foliage studies process. 

I had been studying succulents for a while and even created some sugar versions but only did so from images found online, never from a succulent I saw in person or owned. 

On May 29, 2018, I bought an Echeveria Runyonii "Topsy Turvy", a Crassula ovata "Gollum Jade", and an Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg.

From bottom up: Grafted Euphorbia lactea crest "Coral Cactus", Echeveria "Topsy Turvy", E. Perle Von Nurnberg, "Gollum Jade"

Succulents - coral cactus, echeveria runyonii topsy turvy, echeveria perle von nurnberg, crassula ovata gollum jade aka shrek plant

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy"

"Gollum Jade" aka "Shrek plant"

crassula ovata "gollum jade" aka "Shrek plant"

"Gollum Jade" detail

crassula ovata gollum jade aka shrek plant detail

Some of these succulent purchases needed a bit of care. In researching how to care for them, I discovered I could propagate them - or grow new clone versions of them.

 

I carefully removed a few leaves from each, choosing those with a few flaws or whatever removed leaves would give the succulent(s) a clean and trim look. For the Echeverias, I wiggled the leaves side to side, holding as close to the stem as possible until they came off cleanly, no part of the leaf breaking. For the "Gollum Jade", I used sanitized garden shears to make cuts close to the stem.

I decided to use dry propagation as I do not have much window space in which to place succulent soil trays with the propagated leaves. I used small plastic cups and placed the leaves with the cut portion upright on my narrow window sills. I came upon the dry propagation process at Angelsgrove.com .

I began the propagation process on June 1, 2018.

Ten days later, I saw this:

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" dry propagation progress at 10 days

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" dry propagation at 10 days

echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 10 days baby

At the ten day progress mark on June 11, 2018, only two leaves had growth. All others had no growth and no roots.

The two Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" leaves that had growth continued to grow rapidly. I checked the leaves periodically and began to see pink areas on the other Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" leaves where there would either be new growth in either a baby succulent or roots. You can see some of the pink area I mean in the above image with two succulent leaves at 10 days progress.

The E. Perle Von Nurnberg and the "Gollum Jade" leaves had no growth and no signs of potential growth for close to a week after June 11, 2018.

 

Then I checked the leaves today, June 19, 2018 and noticed that the E. Perle Von Nurnberg had no baby succulents, but did have roots. 

Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg dry propagation progress day 18.

Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg dry propagation progress day 18.

Only one of the "Gollum jade" leaves had new growth or potential growth of any kind:

"Gollum Jade" dry propagation progress 18 days.

crassula ovata gollum jade shrek plant dry propagation progress 18 days baby

Most of the Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" leaves had either succulent babies, roots, or potential growth signs:

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" dry propagation progress 18 days.

echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 18 days roots

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" dry propagation progress 18 days.

echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 18 days baby

The two "Topsy Turvy" leaves that had growth after 10 days were a good size larger. One continued to grow but still had no roots and the other continued to grow and grew roots as well.

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" dry propagation progress 18 days. (This leaf had new growth at 10 days).

echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 18 days baby

Echeveria "Topsy Turvy" dry propagation progress 18 days. (This leaf had new growth at 10 days).

I will continue to post the progress of these propagations.

Here is an image of my dry propagated leaves in plastic cups. I cut some of the cups so that portions of leaves were not resting on plastic. I did this as I was not seeing any growth on many leaves and thought it might be due to a lack of sunlight, that it was blocking sun.

Succulent dry propagation - Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg in cup. Cut side of leaves up. Rows of propagated leaves in cups on window sill. 

succulent dry propagation Echeveria perle von nurnberg leaves - other cups on widow sill

This spot (in image above) on my window sill is particularly well suited for dry propagation I believe as it is a West facing window (sun rays not as intense as say a South facing one) and if there were a bit of direct sun, the plants outside block it somewhat. From what I've read and seen in regards to succulent care, direct sunlight is to be avoided on propagated leaves, especially when they have new root growth. You do not want your roots to burn.

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