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First Succulent Propagation Update 2

(Dry Method Status)

July 26, 2018

 

This is the third entry and second update in the "First Propagation" series:

Entry 2 - First Succulent Propagation Update 1 (Includes Dry Method)

Entry 1 - Succulent Dry Propagation (a beginner's first try)

__________ _ __________

 

       At 54 days, a few of my Echeveria Topsy Turvy propagations (all using the dry method*) had mother leaves that were almost completely dried out (Images 1 - 5). I decided to pot these so that their roots would be covered in soil by the time the mother leaf completely breaks off. I noticed that some roots looked very dry (Image 2). Some were also etiolated** (Image 1, left leaf) but many others in the same containers are/were not. 

 

*Dry propagation: drying leaves, cut end up, in cups or similar container, not atop soil

**Etiolated: stretched out succulents due to lack of sun 

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaves babies

Image 1

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby
succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby

Image 3

Image 2

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby

Image 4

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby

I potted the succulent babies in 2 1/4 in. plastic orchid pots I bought at a local orchid florist. I purchased them super cheap but if you cannot find them locally, I recommend purchasing small seedling/succulent pots on Amazon. I used a succulent mix made of equal parts Miracle-Gro succulent potting soil, perlite, and expanded shale. I bought the perlite on Amazon as well, and purchased the expanded shale at an independent local garden center. 

After filling up the pots with my succulent mix, I spritzed the center lightly with water using the stream setting (Image 6). I then used my finger to carefully place the leaves in the center (Image 7).

Image 5

I covered the roots as much as possible (Image 8 - 10), and for small crevices, I used a toothpick to do so (Image 9).

I then placed my newly potted succulent babies outside (Images 11 -12). I placed them in an area that would provide early morning light and afternoon shade, in front of my East facing window.

misting succulent soil for potting succulent babies

Image 6

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby pottng

Image 8

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby in potting soil

Image 10

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby potting

Image 7

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby potting it using toothpick

Image 9

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby in potting soil in pot

Image 11

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days dried leaf baby in pottng soil in pot

Image 12

Even though all leaves were propagated at the same time and in virtually identical sunlight, there was great variation in the presence of dried roots and the degree of dryness. Therefore, I decided to switch the remaining Echeveria Topsy Turvy leaves from dry to atop succulent soil propagation as a preventive measure (Images 13 - 14). I used 6 inch plastic trays from a local chain garden center. For these propagations, I simply placed the leaves atop the soil and dampened the area where the roots are using the stream setting on my spray bottle. I do not spritz the succulent leaves themselves.

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days switch to soil propagation in tray

Image 13

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation progress 54 days switch to soil propagation in tray with echeveria perle non nurnberg

Image 14: Echeveria Topsy Turvy leaves in tray with some of my Echeveria Perle von Nurnberg propagations

I look forward to see all of my remaining Echeveria Topsy Turvy babies grow enough to pot and to see them mature fully. One of the things I have most appreciated thus far from my first attempt at succulent propagation is that even if a succulent is dying, you may still be able to "save" it by propagation. I did this with an Echeveria Fleur Blanc which I "lost" to root rot present at time of purchase; I was able to salvage some of the leaves and they are now growing roots - hopefully a future blog if they survive.

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