©2018 BY THE CONFECTIONERY GALLERY. PROUDLY CREATED WITH WIX.COM

First Succulent Propagation Update

(includes dry method)

July 20, 2018

 

This post is an update to the "Succulent Dry Propagation (a beginner's first try)" post - https://www.theconfectionerygallery.com/firstpropagation . 

We begin with the Echeveria Perle von Nurnberg, which I switched over to the propagation on succulent soil method.

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 1

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 2

I first noticed growths on the PVNs (Perle von Nurnberg{s}) at 23 days (Image 1 and 2), whereas previously they only had roots. At this point, roots varied in size from very small to very long.

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths
succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 3

Image 4

At the 28 day mark (Image 3 and 4), there was a noticeable increase in previous growth (see Image 1 and 3 - the same leaf). This is also where I first noticed any degree of dried root tips (Image 4). I didn't think much of it at the time as it was only a small amount and it was the only PVN and only succulent leaf with any such damage. I moved the PVN leaves to a spot on my windowsill that had less sunlight to try and remedy the situation. Also of note, Image 4 has two growths on either side of the calloused end. Since I am still new to propagation, I wonder how I will plant such growths once the mother leaf dries out. For instance, will there be two separate growths that pull away from the mother leaf with their respective roots once fully dried or will these two growths eventually 'fuse' into one? I will post the result in a future blog.

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 5

Dried leaf ends began to appear at 37 days (Image 5).

This is also where I noticed an increase in dried roots despite moving them to an area with less sunlight, the light always filtered (Image 6 - 8). The roots in Image 6 were almost completely dried up. I am not sure what exactly the cause was as I tried moving the leaves to another spot on my windowsill and all other dry propagated leaves begun at the same time as the PVNs (Echeveria Runyonii Topsy Turvy) had no root damage whatsoever. About 1/3 of the PVNs have very little to no dried roots (Image 9 - 10). I decided to switch the PVN propagation from the dry method to atop succulent soil.

All succulent baby growths were normal, despite dried roots, or lack of any roots (Image 9 - 10).

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 6

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 7

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 8

Image 9

Image 10

I used a 6 inch plastic tray I bought at my local Home Improvement store to place the succulent soil in (Image 11 - 12). I currently use equal parts Miracle-Gro Cactus Palm and Citrus Potting Mix, Perlite, and Expanded Shale. The potting mix I purchased at my local Home Improvement store, the Perlite at Amazon.com, and the Expanded Shale at one of my local gardening stores.

succulent tray fo propagation

Image 11

succulent tray for propagation wth soil

Image 12

I placed most PVNs on the succulent soil root side down (Image 13) except the ones with two growths on either side of the calloused end, such as that in Image 9. For these, I placed them sideways (Image 14, and middle leaf in Image 15), to allow the roots to grow downward and the growths on either end to grow. I felt that if I placed them the way I placed the others, that it would inhibit succulent baby growth on the end that was face down in the soil. Not sure if that would actually happen, but being a beginner, I just felt comfortable placing them in the tray this way.

succulent echeveria perle von nurnberg propagation leaf with growths

Image 13

Image 14

Image 15

I water the PVNs in the succulent soil tray using a cup of water and straw. I tap the top of the straw in the water to draw some into the straw. I then release my finger slightly if I want to water an area of soil a bit or release my finger completely if I want to water an area more. I do not spray my leaves or water any other area of the soil other than the area on the calloused end where the roots and succulent babies emanate from.

__________ _ ___________

Moving on to the Echeveria Runyonii Topsy Turvy leaves which I have continued propagating using the dry method.

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 16

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 17

The Echeveria Runyonii Topsy Turvy leaves have greater variations in growths at the 28 day mark and in general. They also have the greatest amount of double growths, or succulent "twin babies" (Image 16 - 17, 20 - 21) which are either on the same side, or one on either side of the calloused end. The roots on the Topsy Turvy leaves are in much greater abundance and health in contrast to the PVNs (Images 17 - 19).

Those that first showed signs of new succulent growth at the 10 day mark continue to increase in size (Images 18 - 21) .

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 18

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 19

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 20

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 21

Dry sections first appeared at 37 days on those leaves that had growths at the 10 day mark (Image 22 - 24).

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 22

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 23

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 24

Its very interesting to see the variations in growth. It seems the wider the leaf on the Topsy Turvy leaf, the larger and wider the growths (Image 25 - 28 at 37 days).

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 25

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 26 (Image 25 in opposite order from left to right.)

One of the most interesting and exciting things to happen is the sight of a crested succulent baby in one of two stem growths on the same leaf (Image 27 - 28). The stem on the left, the crested one, is wider than the one on the right. I will include closeups of this crested stem a bit later.

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 27

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 28

Here are Images 16 and 17 (28 days) at 39 days progress (Image 29 - 30) ...

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 29

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 30

... and other leaves at the same number of days progress.

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf
succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 31

Image 32

Of these leaves at 42 days progress (Image 33 - 38), one can see new growths that are lighter in color than the more established leaves (Image 35 - 37).

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 33

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf
succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 34

Image 35

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 36

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf
succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf

Image 37

Image 38

Here is a closeup of the crested succulent baby with two stem growths (Image 39) at 48 days progress. One can clearly see the wide stem indicating of a crested succulent. Leaves atop a crested succulent stem tend to grow very compact.

The roots are small but healthy (Image 40 - 41) and the end has begun to dry out (Image 42). One can clearly see the difference in width on the narrower/normal sized stem (Image 43).

I can see this particular leaf beginning to stretch (Image 46 - 48), I believe indicating a lack of sunlight. I moved it to an area on my windowsill with a bit more light in an attempt to stop the stretching. If it is very noticeable once it is more established and larger, I will trim it as needed.

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 39

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 40

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 41

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 42

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 43

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 44

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 45

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 46

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 47

succulent echeveria runyonii topsy turvy dry propagation leaf crested

Image 48

 __________ _ ____________

succulent crassula ovata gollum jade shrek ears plant propagation leaf

Image 49

Moving on to the Crassula Ovata "Gollum Jade" or "Shrek Ears plant".

 

I have continued dry propagation for this succulent.

At 23 days, the initial growth has increased in size, with a small root sprouted as well (Image 49).

There are additional leaf and root growths at 37 days (Image 50 - 52).

The Gollum Jade has been the most difficult to propagate. Of the more than ten leaves propagated, only the leaf in these images has growth. Although no other leaf shows signs of either a baby succulent or roots, the leaves are still healthy. I will keep these leaves for a good while longer to see if they eventually propagate fully.

succulent crassula ovata gollum jade shrek ears plant propagation leaf

Image 50

succulent crassula ovata gollum jade shrek ears plant propagation leaf

Image 51

succulent crassula ovata gollum jade shrek ears plant propagation leaf

Image 52

Thank you for visiting,

The Confectionery Gallery